Surbiton man Freddie Lee caught with 50 cannabis plants claimed he was house-sitting for his wife

Surrey Comet: Surbiton man Freddie Lee caught with 50 cannabis plants claimed he was house-sitting for his wife Surbiton man Freddie Lee caught with 50 cannabis plants claimed he was house-sitting for his wife

A gardener who had 51 cannabis plants growing in his garage told police officers searching his property that he was just house-sitting for his wife.

Freddie Lee, 55, of Thornhill Road, in Surbiton, later changed his story and said in a statement read out in court that he had rented his garage out to a man for storage purposes.

He said he had come to an agreement with the man for a sum of £50 a week, but refused to identify him for fear of his safety.

Mr Lee was convicted by a jury on Wednesday of being concerned in the production of a controlled class B drug after officers searched his home on July 20, 2011.

The cannabis plants ranging between 40cm and 110cm were found in his garage after police officers executed a search warrant of the three-bedroom detached property that evening.

Prosecutor Timothy Godfrey said: “Officers carried out a search of the house – nothing incriminating was found.

“However, the house had a garage, where 51 plants were growing. “The walls were lined with silver foil.

“There were 14 overhead 600 watt lights, extracting fans and an electric thermometer. There were also electric pumps to collect water. It’s on this basis that I say it was a cannabis factory.”

Investigating officer Detective Constable Clayton Warracker, who gave evidence, confirmed that although the garage could have been accessible by pedestrians from around the back – the door had been blocked making the access point from the garden of the homeowner.

Two other people – a man believed to be Mr Lee’s nephew and a woman were also charged after their fingerprints were found on the site.

They were discharged ahead of the trial that began at Kingston Crown Court on Monday, January 7. Lee will be sentenced on January 18.

Comments (6)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

8:56am Fri 11 Jan 13

Babs Stanley says...

Why don't we try taking a completely new approach to cannabis? Around three million people in Britain are regular users and whatever we do we're not going to be able to stop them.

We waste £500 million every year on police, court and prison resources when a large proportion of society uses cannabis without any problem at all. In fact, the only real problem with cannabis is that it's illegal.

The risks to health are very small - much, much less than alcohol or tobacco. By a recent analysis of mortality, hospital admissions, toxicity and propensity to psychosis, cannabis is nearly 3000 times safer than alcohol. Why not introduce a tax and regulate system and realise the benefits?

That way we'd have a properly regulated supply chain with no criminals involved, no theft of electricity, no human trafficking, no destruction of property and disruption of neighbourhoods. Then there would be some control over this huge market. There would be thousands of new jobs, sales would be from licensed outlets to adults only with guaranteed quality and safety. Then our police could start going after some real wrongdoing instead of trying to fight a crime that exists only because of a misguided government policy.
Why don't we try taking a completely new approach to cannabis? Around three million people in Britain are regular users and whatever we do we're not going to be able to stop them. We waste £500 million every year on police, court and prison resources when a large proportion of society uses cannabis without any problem at all. In fact, the only real problem with cannabis is that it's illegal. The risks to health are very small - much, much less than alcohol or tobacco. By a recent analysis of mortality, hospital admissions, toxicity and propensity to psychosis, cannabis is nearly 3000 times safer than alcohol. Why not introduce a tax and regulate system and realise the benefits? That way we'd have a properly regulated supply chain with no criminals involved, no theft of electricity, no human trafficking, no destruction of property and disruption of neighbourhoods. Then there would be some control over this huge market. There would be thousands of new jobs, sales would be from licensed outlets to adults only with guaranteed quality and safety. Then our police could start going after some real wrongdoing instead of trying to fight a crime that exists only because of a misguided government policy. Babs Stanley
  • Score: 0

10:36am Fri 11 Jan 13

Joel Dalais says...

I'm sorry, but, what is the Crime here? Intent to Supply? Intent to supply what? There is nothing.

But I do know where there's a multi-million dealer sanctioned by the government who has large FACTORIES (hah) in the UK growing Cannabis, with sales of over £50 MILLION a year.

You'd think that might be worth some police attention? Maybe knock on GW Pharma door, or Number 10 Downing Street, seeing as they're the ones allowing it and enforcing an illegal monopoly.

But .. no ... Let the Police be part of one the largest, and continuous crimes perpetrated by our government (ofc there are others as we well know).

The Police Officer in charge of the national terrorism financial unit was recently found to be corrupt.

More and more people are finding out, the agencies and institutions are being more ridiculed, which is a real shame, because there are some honest good hard working people in the justice system. But Prohibition has created corruption almost beyond their control.

Hence why the people are leading, and the Politicians are being led.


Joel Dalais
CLEAR Media Team
CLEAR - Cannabis Law Reform
I'm sorry, but, what is the Crime here? Intent to Supply? Intent to supply what? There is nothing. But I do know where there's a multi-million dealer sanctioned by the government who has large FACTORIES (hah) in the UK growing Cannabis, with sales of over £50 MILLION a year. You'd think that might be worth some police attention? Maybe knock on GW Pharma door, or Number 10 Downing Street, seeing as they're the ones allowing it and enforcing an illegal monopoly. But .. no ... Let the Police be part of one the largest, and continuous crimes perpetrated by our government (ofc there are others as we well know). The Police Officer in charge of the national terrorism financial unit was recently found to be corrupt. More and more people are finding out, the agencies and institutions are being more ridiculed, which is a real shame, because there are some honest good hard working people in the justice system. But Prohibition has created corruption almost beyond their control. Hence why the people are leading, and the Politicians are being led. Joel Dalais CLEAR Media Team CLEAR - Cannabis Law Reform Joel Dalais
  • Score: 0

1:42pm Fri 11 Jan 13

Prince Philip of Greece says...

De-criminalise, or legalise, or whatever - just please take cannabis out of the hands of gangs and dealers.

The only time I've ever been offered hard drugs, is when I've been buying cannabis. The argument that cannabis is a "gateway drug" is ONLY true (and only true to a limited extent) BECAUSE it is illegal.
De-criminalise, or legalise, or whatever - just please take cannabis out of the hands of gangs and dealers. The only time I've ever been offered hard drugs, is when I've been buying cannabis. The argument that cannabis is a "gateway drug" is ONLY true (and only true to a limited extent) BECAUSE it is illegal. Prince Philip of Greece
  • Score: 0

5:32pm Fri 11 Jan 13

SuperSilverSourDiesel says...

Why is prohibition such a problem? Well, children find cannabis easier to obtain than alcohol and tobacco (dealers dont ask for ID) Children moving onto other drugs, cannabis isnt a gateway drug, but the dealers are and may pressurize the young and vulnerable. Children are being enticed by the gangsterism cannabis prohibition has helped create, and kids are lured into organized crime. Cannabis being illegal glamorizes it in the eyes of the young rebel. Dealers only sell the stronger strains. Dealers get involved in theft of electricity, human trafficking, gang violence. The list does go on...
Why is prohibition such a problem? Well, children find cannabis easier to obtain than alcohol and tobacco (dealers dont ask for ID) Children moving onto other drugs, cannabis isnt a gateway drug, but the dealers are and may pressurize the young and vulnerable. Children are being enticed by the gangsterism cannabis prohibition has helped create, and kids are lured into organized crime. Cannabis being illegal glamorizes it in the eyes of the young rebel. Dealers only sell the stronger strains. Dealers get involved in theft of electricity, human trafficking, gang violence. The list does go on... SuperSilverSourDiesel
  • Score: 0

5:38pm Fri 11 Jan 13

George Plimpton says...

The whole drug policy in this country has been badly managed from the start.

As much as we would like our children to stay away from drugs, they are bound to experiment. Heavy handed approach just has not worked.

You see it in schools, they don't seem to have a clue how to talk to young people.

It is one giant **** up. our children are the ones who are suffering. it is very hard to take.
The whole drug policy in this country has been badly managed from the start. As much as we would like our children to stay away from drugs, they are bound to experiment. Heavy handed approach just has not worked. You see it in schools, they don't seem to have a clue how to talk to young people. It is one giant **** up. our children are the ones who are suffering. it is very hard to take. George Plimpton
  • Score: 0

5:48pm Fri 11 Jan 13

SuperSilverSourDiesel says...

George Plimpton wrote:
The whole drug policy in this country has been badly managed from the start.

As much as we would like our children to stay away from drugs, they are bound to experiment. Heavy handed approach just has not worked.

You see it in schools, they don't seem to have a clue how to talk to young people.

It is one giant **** up. our children are the ones who are suffering. it is very hard to take.
Agreed

“Many people who think of themselves as the beneficiaries of prohibition are really net losers. Parents are much more at risk of losing their children under prohibition than they would be if there was some kind of system where we had some measure of control over illicit drugs.” - Peter Baume Former Australian Minister for Health, Minister for Education & Minister for Aboriginal Affairs
[quote][p][bold]George Plimpton[/bold] wrote: The whole drug policy in this country has been badly managed from the start. As much as we would like our children to stay away from drugs, they are bound to experiment. Heavy handed approach just has not worked. You see it in schools, they don't seem to have a clue how to talk to young people. It is one giant **** up. our children are the ones who are suffering. it is very hard to take.[/p][/quote]Agreed “Many people who think of themselves as the beneficiaries of prohibition are really net losers. Parents are much more at risk of losing their children under prohibition than they would be if there was some kind of system where we had some measure of control over illicit drugs.” - Peter Baume Former Australian Minister for Health, Minister for Education & Minister for Aboriginal Affairs SuperSilverSourDiesel
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree