Commuter falls through gap at Norbiton rail station

Commuter falls through gap at Norbiton rail staion

Commuter falls through gap at Norbiton rail staion

First published in News Surrey Comet: Photograph of the Author by , Chief reporter

A rail commuter slipped and fell into the gap between the train and platform during rush hour this morning.

The incident happened at around 7.20am as the man was stepping off the train at Norbiton station.

A spokeswoman for the South West Trains Network Rail Alliance said: "A member of station staff assisted the passenger back on to the platform.

“The person involved was not injured and subsequently left the station shortly afterwards without requiring any medical attention."

Leanne Lucy McGirr tweeted: “My fear of the big gap between train & platform at Norbiton was confirmed today, a man fell beneath the train. Luckily he's ok #scarycommute.”

Comments (10)

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5:06pm Thu 29 Nov 12

Hove Ex-Pat says...

Glad he was not injured, but, what distracted him? I would suggest it is odds on that he was reading his phone, texting or tweeting. This is a regular activity everyday when pedestrians are crossing the road, boarding a bus or boarding a tube or train. It will result in a death soon, not with this guy because the shock of this will do it's job.
Glad he was not injured, but, what distracted him? I would suggest it is odds on that he was reading his phone, texting or tweeting. This is a regular activity everyday when pedestrians are crossing the road, boarding a bus or boarding a tube or train. It will result in a death soon, not with this guy because the shock of this will do it's job. Hove Ex-Pat
  • Score: 0

12:35am Fri 30 Nov 12

Foo Bear says...

This happened to me in June at the top end of the up platform, at about 07:20 awell while boardig the train.

I slipped on the wet step, and went down the gap aswell, but stopped myself going all the way by catching myself by the elbows on the edges of teh step and the platform. Was able topick myself up and carry on, but I could have gone all the way and none of the train staff would likely have known.

Norbiton is a problem, and perhaps with the forthcoming platform extensions, Network Rail and South West Trains should look to moving the platforms up the line to a straight section of track.
This happened to me in June at the top end of the up platform, at about 07:20 awell while boardig the train. I slipped on the wet step, and went down the gap aswell, but stopped myself going all the way by catching myself by the elbows on the edges of teh step and the platform. Was able topick myself up and carry on, but I could have gone all the way and none of the train staff would likely have known. Norbiton is a problem, and perhaps with the forthcoming platform extensions, Network Rail and South West Trains should look to moving the platforms up the line to a straight section of track. Foo Bear
  • Score: 0

11:09am Fri 30 Nov 12

GR-London says...

When you think about it, railways are very unsafe places.
Pedestrians aren't allowed to walk along a motorway, but can stand on a platform with trains whizzing past.

If the same thinking was applied to railways as it is road safety, railways would be no-go areas.

Another example of the many double standards in life.
Government should have made the railways safer many years ago.
When you think about it, railways are very unsafe places. Pedestrians aren't allowed to walk along a motorway, but can stand on a platform with trains whizzing past. If the same thinking was applied to railways as it is road safety, railways would be no-go areas. Another example of the many double standards in life. Government should have made the railways safer many years ago. GR-London
  • Score: 0

11:49am Fri 30 Nov 12

321200 says...

Foo Bear- all very well saying move the station up... Sure it will be possible to move the platforms but then impossible to have a station as the area is bounded by properties
Foo Bear- all very well saying move the station up... Sure it will be possible to move the platforms but then impossible to have a station as the area is bounded by properties 321200
  • Score: 0

1:50am Sun 2 Dec 12

Foo Bear says...

@ 321200
There is plenty of space for extension and relocation of the platforms onto the straight section of track up the line from the current location. There is also railway land adjacent that is current unused.

The current access would still be useable because it is close to the straight section. Additional access could be provided from Gloucester Road rail bridge.

The constraint is the cost. Work has to be done for the lengthening of the trains to 10 (and thence 12) carriages but unless a good safety case is made I am sure any budget allocation would only cover lengthening, but at least it should add some sections of straight platform.
@ 321200 There is plenty of space for extension and relocation of the platforms onto the straight section of track up the line from the current location. There is also railway land adjacent that is current unused. The current access would still be useable because it is close to the straight section. Additional access could be provided from Gloucester Road rail bridge. The constraint is the cost. Work has to be done for the lengthening of the trains to 10 (and thence 12) carriages but unless a good safety case is made I am sure any budget allocation would only cover lengthening, but at least it should add some sections of straight platform. Foo Bear
  • Score: 0

1:56am Sun 2 Dec 12

Foo Bear says...

@GR-London
The railways are far safer now than they were in the nationalised ear.

To put it in context - there are many roads with speeds greater than 30 mph were pedestrians have diect access.

Members of the public do not under go the level of training that rail staff do.

In terms of safety, the railways are safer than road or air travel in the number of fatalities per journey.

In GreaterLondon, you are in more danger of being hit by a rogue cyclist than by a train.
@GR-London The railways are far safer now than they were in the nationalised ear. To put it in context - there are many roads with speeds greater than 30 mph were pedestrians have diect access. Members of the public do not under go the level of training that rail staff do. In terms of safety, the railways are safer than road or air travel in the number of fatalities per journey. In GreaterLondon, you are in more danger of being hit by a rogue cyclist than by a train. Foo Bear
  • Score: 0

5:10pm Mon 3 Dec 12

GR-London says...

@Foo Bear
"The railways are far safer now than they were in the nationalised ear"??

And the world has moved on too.

"To put it in context - there are many roads with speeds greater than 30 mph were pedestrians have diect access."

With a six feet drop onto a live rail with thousands of volts and express cars and lorries whizzing past???

"Members of the public do not under go the level of training that rail staff do."

Good point, well made. Let's have intensive training for the public if they are to use the railways.

"In terms of safety, the railways are safer than road or air travel in the number of fatalities per journey."

So you say. Where do you source this info?

"In GreaterLondon, you are in more danger of being hit by a rogue cyclist than by a train."

People aren't generally expected to walk out in front of a train as they are to cross a road.
Speaking as someone who cycles, if I had a pound for every daft pedestrian who stepped out in front of me without looking, we could both have a nice meal.

Sorry, case not made.
@Foo Bear "The railways are far safer now than they were in the nationalised ear"?? And the world has moved on too. "To put it in context - there are many roads with speeds greater than 30 mph were pedestrians have diect access." With a six feet drop onto a live rail with thousands of volts and express cars and lorries whizzing past??? "Members of the public do not under go the level of training that rail staff do." Good point, well made. Let's have intensive training for the public if they are to use the railways. "In terms of safety, the railways are safer than road or air travel in the number of fatalities per journey." So you say. Where do you source this info? "In GreaterLondon, you are in more danger of being hit by a rogue cyclist than by a train." People aren't generally expected to walk out in front of a train as they are to cross a road. Speaking as someone who cycles, if I had a pound for every daft pedestrian who stepped out in front of me without looking, we could both have a nice meal. Sorry, case not made. GR-London
  • Score: 0

7:14pm Mon 3 Dec 12

Foo Bear says...

@GR-London
- The rail is electrified at 650/740 volts - it would still kill you, but you would have to cross the tack to reach it. You can protect people from injury through accident, but it is not practical if they are determined to inflict injury on themselves.

- For the numbers of passenger fatalities per journey, go and look them up. The figures are produced by the Rail Regulators and by the aviation industry.

Other than that, your points are somewhat churlish.

The topic is concerning an accident involving a member of the public on one of the platforms at Norbiton Station. This has happened before. The location of the station on a sharply curved section of track results in passengers having to step across a significant gap with both horizontal and vertical displacement.

Other than signage and public announcements at the station, a question I would ask of South West Trains is what practical steps have or are being taken to avoid injury or fatalities at Norbiton Station due to the conditions described above?
@GR-London - The rail is electrified at 650/740 volts - it would still kill you, but you would have to cross the tack to reach it. You can protect people from injury through accident, but it is not practical if they are determined to inflict injury on themselves. - For the numbers of passenger fatalities per journey, go and look them up. The figures are produced by the Rail Regulators and by the aviation industry. Other than that, your points are somewhat churlish. The topic is concerning an accident involving a member of the public on one of the platforms at Norbiton Station. This has happened before. The location of the station on a sharply curved section of track results in passengers having to step across a significant gap with both horizontal and vertical displacement. Other than signage and public announcements at the station, a question I would ask of South West Trains is what practical steps have or are being taken to avoid injury or fatalities at Norbiton Station due to the conditions described above? Foo Bear
  • Score: 0

6:57pm Tue 4 Dec 12

GR-London says...

@Foo Bear
You make the point better than I did. Thanks.
@Foo Bear You make the point better than I did. Thanks. GR-London
  • Score: 0

11:58pm Tue 11 Dec 12

GR-London says...

@Foo Bear

I meant to say, you made my point better than I did.
@Foo Bear I meant to say, you made my point better than I did. GR-London
  • Score: 0

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