Just when you thought you'd got over your crippling Pokémon Go addiction, along comes Nintendo's latest mobile phone game.

And judging on first impressions, it's great.

Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp came out today on iOS and Android and is set to be the next big thing in mobile games.

It's a mobile spin-off of Nintendo's Animal Crossing console games, which gave you a virtual house in a picture-postcard cartoon town populated by adorable animals, gave you a virtual mortgage to pay off (yes, really) and then gave you the freedom to potter about at your own leisure.

Surrey Comet:

For this mobile outing the setting has changed to a camp site but the general idea of the game - wander around, make friends with animals, shake a tree to pick apples, maybe do a little fishing - is very familiar.

It's a little oasis of calm in your pocket and exudes charm in spades.

And going mobile has made it much easier to interact with friends - you can visit their camps, they can visit yours (although inevitably they all look pretty much the same at this early stage) and you can buy and sell unwanted items.

However, AC:PC is also afflicted with one of the less savoury aspects of mobile gaming: in-app purchases.

Surrey Comet:

Nintendo describe the game as "free-to-start", and as far as we could gather in our limited play time so far it seems pretty much everything in the game can be accessed without paying real money.

But that comes at the cost of waiting for stuff to happen.

For instance, pick an apple for your new pal Goldie the golden retriever and a timer appears over the tree showing how long it'll take them to grow back - three hours in real time, or you can use a bag of fertiliser on the apple tree to speed things along. The fertiliser costs 'leaf tickets', which can be bought using real-world money in transactions ranging from 99p to £38.99.

In the early game this doesn't seem too much of a worry, but experience in similar games suggest the waiting times will get longer and longer for the more desirable items later on.

Parents will want to make sure in-app purchases are turned off.

Surrey Comet:

But much of the charm of earlier Animal Crossing games has always been the leisurely pace, and waiting for events in real time - certain insects only come out at night, or events only happen on certain days of the week. Even the in-game seasons progress at the same pace as real life.

So unless you're impatient, you'll be able to enjoy Pocket Camp in small doses - and there's plenty to enjoy.